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  • The Midnight Library written by Matt Haig
    By: Destiny Breniser   What if you had the chance to live another life instead of the one you are currently living? This story turns the idea of a multiverse on its head centered on what happens when you die.  This book was published in 2020 with its genre being science fiction. The place you go when […]
  • They Both Die at the End – General Review
    Summer break is the perfect opportunity to get back into reading. Adam Silvera’s (2017) novel, They Both Die at the End, can serve as a stepping stone into the realm of reading. The pace is fast, action-packed, and develops loveable characters. Also, Silvera switches point of view each chapter where narration mainly focuses on the protagonists, […]

Adapting to new technology proves more difficult for some

It’s only been a few months since I finally caved in and purchased one, but I can proudly say that my choice to obtain a cellular phone was one of the best decisions I have made in quite a while.

Yes, I’m talking about my first cell phone. Shocking, I know; try not to faint.

Looking back, I can still easily understand how I managed without it. By using e-mail and lots of face-to-face communication, I was able to manage without a mobile phone and still have a decent social life. But finally acquiring a mobile communication device made things so much simpler.

Put simply, my little flip-open, noise-generating plastic rectangle has made a rather profound impact on my life, enabling me to be easily contacted for business, academic or social purposes – which is a good thing.

But another issue which comes to mind when pondering my recent act of purchasing a mobile phone is my inherent reluctance to adopt, learn and use new technologies – this is a bad thing.

In today’s ever-growing and ever-changing information age society, new technologies are constantly cropping up around us. From cell phones replacing landlines to computers supplanting typewriters, newer tech almost always dominates and replaces the older tech.

And as history (both recent and old) will tell, those who refuse to adapt to new technological advancements can be swept to the wayside. Meanwhile, those who do adapt and learn are the ones who keep their jobs and get new ones.

This is what scares me. While I do want to remain competitive and technologically compliant as a professional in my chosen field, my past attitude toward purchasing new technology (vital stuff) was one characterized by unhealthy amounts of a reluctance to commit to a purchase.

To put it bluntly, I simply don’t like buying new electronics. It feels like a waste of money to me, regardless of what I will be using said technology for. This part of me needs to change.

I’ve had people call me “grandpa” in the past due to my penchant for reading the newspaper on a daily basis, as well as my lack of a television and a mobile phone. Now, I can only say that I am slightly less of a grandparent, due to my current possession of a cell phone.

My case is by no means indicative of the greater population of America. Not everyone shares my Luddite tendencies, after all. In truth, I have yet to meet a single person here at the University (faculty, student, professor or otherwise) who does not have a cell phone.

Last semester, in a class of roughly 35 students, I was the only person who did not raise a hand during the poll, signifying I was the odd man out when cell phones came to discussion. The same applies to my high school years as well.

I’m glad that I finally chose to adapt. It would appear everyone else is ahead of the curve, and I am in danger of being left in the dust.

When it comes to phones, computers and digital cameras, I have always been among the late adopter crowd, finally choosing to purchase the devices long after they have achieved mainstream market presence. My parents didn’t even have any sort of Internet access in our home until my Junior year of high school, three years ago.

When it comes to MP3 players, video game systems, e-book readers, smartphones, GPS units and other assorted “cutting edge” technologies, I have yet to adapt. No iPod, X-Box, Kindle, Blackberry, Garmin or anything else for me. I guess I just don’t need it.

And while these specific technologies may not be vital to my success in the workplace, my refusal to adopt and learn them and other technologies like them may very well be indicative of an adaptation problem in me. For crying out loud, I just learned how to properly send text messages only two months ago, and I only send about 25 messages per month. I know people who send over 1,000 texts in the same time period.

Wow. I need to get with it.

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