Student music tastes change

Pulse Reporter and Pulse Reporter

Although some clubs have been around for years, the music played and requested is always changing.

Some DJs and music professionals in the area are paying attention to the different ways students are listening and dancing to music.

Manny Marcelo, also known as Kiss FM’s DJ Manny, spends Fridays and Saturdays at Cla-Zel providing students with music.

When Marcelo first began his career nine years ago, he said the main music style was hip-hop.

As time went on “it went to slower hip-hop,” he said. “Then it went to pop and now we are at the end of a dance phase.”

Some songs become popular because of a dance that goes along with it, Marcelo said.

“‘Cupid’s Shuffle’ still hasn’t gone away,” Marcelo said.

Another reason some songs become popular in the clubs is because they talk about birthdays.

Marcelo said some students like to go out and celebrate on these days and he will get a lot of requests for songs that mention birthdays.

“Anytime it’s a birthday, ‘Cake’ by Rihanna is requested,” Marcelo said. “Another popular one is ‘In Da Club’ by 50 Cent because it says, ‘gonna party like it’s your birthday’.”

Music played in the clubs differs from music played on the radio in many ways, Marcelo said.

“In clubs and bars you have to think of your audience. At bars you have a lot of people over 21,” Marcelo said. “On the radio it’s for all audiences. They play [Justin] Bieber on the radio, but not so much in the clubs.”

Associate Professor in the Popular Culture Department, Jeremy Wallach, said club music is about dancing.

“People like to dance,” Wallach said. “The age-old connection between dance and courtship is prominent in BG.”

A lot of the music being played in clubs is techno and dubstep, said freshman Greg Robison.

“All the mainstream music has the dubstep aspect now,” Robison said. “Everything has the bass in the background.”

“The stuff played in clubs is functioned towards dancing,” Wallach said.

The Korean pop song “Gangam Style” has recently gained a lot of popularity in the United States, Wallach said.

It became so popular because it’s a compelling song. Even if you don’t understand the words, you can dance to it, Wallach said.

Some clubs are playing more foreign music.

“It’s only a matter of time before you see more Asian popstars cross over,” Wallach said.

Wallach said American entertainment is very biased, but this will all change once they begin to become a more globally-aware nation.

Bowling Green has music outside of mainstream club music.

“There is Jazz Night on Wednesday nights at One49,” Wallach said. “It’s usually a lot of the Bowling Green faculty performing.”

Downtown also hosts other options like Cafe Havana, Wallach said.

“It’s a real change of pace and they are always looking for live bands,” Wallach said.

Wallach said students have a very limited diet for music.

“Club music will always be more popular than others because you don’t have to think about it,” Wallach said.

Wallach encourages students to go to the on campus music events and check out Jazz Night.

“College is the ideal time to discover music,” Wallach said. “Your mind has evolved enough to appreciate it.”