Obama must keep world affairs in mind during term

Cassie Sullivan and Cassie Sullivan

President Obama won this past Tuesday night against GOP candidate Mitt Romney in a very ground-breaking election that will change the future of America as a whole.

The ideas of same-sex marriage, Medicare, Social Security, the job market, economy and education are just a few of the platforms that the two political parties do not see eye to eye on. Now the election’s finished: The Democratic president is remaining in office.

What’s going on in the international world is something that Obama needs to keep an eye on, along with domestic problems.

The first task will be to replace Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State.

After the mistakes made about handling the embassy attacks in Benghazi, Libya, Clinton said she will be stepping down and retiring from politics after two decades of involvement, leaving Obama to name a successor to the position. The rumored replacements range from Senator John Kerry, to UN Ambassador Susan Rice, to National Security Adviser Thomas Donilon.

Another option that has been thrown around, has been former Ambassador to China, Jon Huntsman. With extensive experience with China, Huntsman might be part of the GOP, but remains a favorite of the Democratic Party.

But of course, none of these candidates could be the one that Obama and his administration picks to fill the vacancy left by Clinton.

Obama will have to figure out the best ways to deal with Middle Eastern countries.

In the past 20 months, 36,000 Syrians have died as the conflicts in the country have reached a full blown civil war. Obama has asked for President Assad to leave, but has ruled out sending any assistance to the Syrian rebels through forms of airstrikes or military assistance, including providing weapons to the rebels.

While Egypt finds a firm footing in their newly democratized government, the U.S. does not plan on listening to the anti-American protests through the Middle East, the U.S. suspended aid talks. Since the sudden round of protests in September, Egypt has gone back to keeping to itself.

Along with NATO, Obama is still planning on withdrawing all American troops from Afghanistan by 2014, even though Obama has struggled to start peace talks with the Afghani government.

American actions against Iran have included sanctions and growing military presences have all failed to stop Iran from building a nuclear weapons arsenal.

During the final presidential debate in October, Obama said the nuclear crisis could be fixed by bilateral negotiations between the two countries for after the elections, but there have been reports of secret meetings on the matter that are slowly becoming public.

Now that the election is over, the U.S. and five other powers are talking to Iran and have requested that Iran stop producing nuclear weapons.

Russian officials were promised that if Obama was re-elected, he would be able to aid in negotiations with NATO with plans to place a missile-defense shield in Eastern Europe, a safeguard just in case NATO has to launch a counterattack against Iran.

During Obama’s first term, he came in promising a “reset” in relations with Russia, even though, since then, ties have been strained with problems while intervening in the Arab Springs. China will also be on Obama’s negotiation’s list.

Obama’s reelection in America influences China greatly, marking that the Chinese believe Obama’s victory would aid in the growth of a strong and healthy relationship between both countries, since America and China support each other in many ways, considering China is holding some of the American debt.

A final issue Obama will have to deal with is drone usage. Since the beginning of his first term, the Obama administration has upped the U.S.age of drones and targeted killing, which are reported, yet the administration never speaks of the program.

While the administration cannot own up to the civilians of Pakistan being killed by drones, the number of wanted Taliban numbers have dropped over the past years.

I do not like speculating on what Obama and his administration plan on doing with the state of the international world as a whole, the best choice that Obama has is to continue talks with different nations on economic and nuclear matters and continue to make sure that relations with other countries remain in a peaceful state.

Obama’s next four years in office will be four years that will set the world stage for the upcoming couple of decades, as long as everything runs as smoothly as he needs them to or, if not, the next four years will turn into more of a winding and bumpy road.

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