University offers remote printing service

Reporter and Reporter

The University has recently released a remote print service throughout campus, which students can use to print from personal computers.

The remote print service is available for download on both Macs and PCs via the wbpage bgsu.edu/printresponsibly.

Information Technology Services made the service available to students on the first day of classes. Before becoming available in dorms and some academic buildings, the service was only in place in the library and commuter lounge, said Debra Wells, director of Client Services with Information Technology Services at the University.

Although it began there, ITS had always planned to expand its use to the whole campus, said ITS Special Projects Manager Josh Von Lehmden.

ITS wanted to “allow students to have more computers available to them” and “to be able to print from their own computers,” Wells said.

This service can be used at almost any computer lab on campus. When sending the printing job to the computer lab through remote print, students will have 24 hours to retrieve it.

Although the download of the service is free, print rates are the same, Von Lehmden said.

While first announced through email and Facebook, there has been no feedback from students yet, indicating they may be unaware of service, Wells said.

If students respond well, the service may be expanded to other locations on campus, Wells said. Students will continue to be notified of the service to get the word out.

While none of the students interviewed knew of the service, most seemed interested in the idea.

Sophomore Hannah McDonald thinks the service may be “convenient” and a “good idea.”

Sophomore Kalene Cawthon thought potential bugs in the system could be a problem with the service. In order to avoid problems, Cawthon said she would likely wait to use the service.

Though some students show concern for glitches, ITS Desktop Support Services Manager Michael Good thinks there is nothing to worry about.

“The software has been in production for two years,” Good said.