Independent student content

BG Falcon Media

Independent student content

BG Falcon Media

Independent student content

BG Falcon Media

Follow us on social
  • They Both Die at the End – General Review
    Summer break is the perfect opportunity to get back into reading. Adam Silvera’s (2017) novel, They Both Die at the End, can serve as a stepping stone into the realm of reading. The pace is fast, action-packed, and develops loveable characters. Also, Silvera switches point of view each chapter where narration mainly focuses on the protagonists, […]
  • My Favorite Book – Freshwater
    If there’s one book that I believe everyone should read once in their life, it’s my favorite book – Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi. From my course, Queer Literature under Dr. Bill Albertini, I discovered Emezi’s Freshwater (2018). Once more, my course, Creative Writing Thesis Workshop under Professor Amorak Huey, was instructed to present our favorite […]

New LGBT student group aims for community vibe

The new group HUE caters to a distinct group of students and issues no other organization on campus addresses. HUE, which stands for Honoring, Urging and Encouraging, is an outlet for LGBT people of color. Junior Austin Williams, president of HUE, started the group in September to provide a different setting than other LGBT groups VISION and Transcendence. HUE is tailored toward racial minorities who also face sexuality and gender issues. ‘There are a lot of people that wanted this organization,’ Williams said, describing HUE as more of a family than student organization. ‘I’m just happy it’s alive.’ Junior Brianna Patman, HUE treasurer, said the group is smaller, more personal and has a totally different vibe, allowing members to vent or simply talk about what’s happening in their lives. ‘We talk about everything under the sun,’ Patman said. ‘Everyone is stressed out about something.’ Williams said HUE works with VISION and Transcendence planning events and the groups even share members. Both Williams and Patman are also VISION members. ‘Just like VISION and Transcendence, HUE is catering to a group of people,’ he said. ‘The goal is pretty much the same.’ However, Patman feels more comfortable with HUE because of all the different cultures the group represents. ‘[HUE] is catered more to people I can relate to,’ she said. ‘This is the best organization I’ve ever really encountered.’ Although the LGBT groups do work together, VISION President Erik Sowers, junior, thinks the groups could work even closer, but understands HUE’s differing purpose on campus. ‘They focus more on building a community versus VISION, which focuses on [LGBT] education,’ Sowers said. He also said that unlike VISION, a group that’s been on campus for around 20 years, HUE is taking a new approach addressing multiple identities. HUE members deal with sexuality, gender and race, whereas VISION deals mostly with sexuality, Sowers said. And though VISION is the broadest LGBT group on campus, he said its 100 plus members are predominantly white. ‘It can be really different coming out as a white person than coming out as a black person,’ he said. Sowers said HUE provides information that pertains to where the movement is going, addressing the acceptance that accompanies different races. ‘It’s a really exciting development,’ Sowers said. ‘It’s probably the most exciting group I’ve heard about in a long time. I would like to see them really flourish.’ HUE, which has 13 listed members, usually sees around 20 or more students at events they put on, but Williams would like to see more members so HUE can remain at the University. He said elections for next year start Sunday. ‘We want the organization to stay around,’ Williams said. He said his favorite part of HUE is the ‘How was your week?’ sessions so he can know what’s been happening in other students’ lives. He also enjoys the events they throw, including guest speakers and helping with the ‘Coming Out Ball’ and ‘Condom Carnival.’ Because the group is in its first year and is relatively unknown, Williams welcomes new faces at meetings. ‘Don’t be scared to come and see what we’re about,’ he said. ‘You might like it.’ Patman agrees HUE is open to any student looking for entertainment and information. ‘Come one, come all,’ she said. HUE holds meetings every Sunday at 8 p.m. in room 103 BA building. Their next event is hosting guest speaker Terrence Dean, a newscaster and New York community activist, on April 18 at 3 p.m. in Union 315.

Leave a Comment
Donate to BG Falcon Media
$1375
$1500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Bowling Green State University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to BG Falcon Media
$1375
$1500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All BG Falcon Media Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *