Grad starts career in Germany

In spring 2012, Scott Thomas graduated from the University and began a new life playing basketball in Germany.

Thomas is playing in his rookie season as forward for the Cuxhaven Bascats. He is currently second in the league and his team has a winning percentage of .500 after its first four games.

“The Bascats have always been a solid organization,” Thomas said. “Everything is going good right now.”

After switching agents and debating where to play professionally, Thomas’ agent convinced him to go to Germany.

“It is safe and the people are friendly,” Thomas said. “I’m definitely happy here.”

Thomas plays in the Pro A division, the second-highest league in Germany.

“I felt like this was a good league to start off with,” Thomas said. “It is well-respected and it will help me get my stock up so I can go to higher [leagues in] countries and be paid more.”

Thomas said he credits his success in basketball to every coach he has ever played for.

“Every coach has helped develop me as a player, on and off the court,” he said.

Thomas said Germany is very different from the United States.

“It took getting used to,” he said. “It was a huge culture shock.”

While at the University, Thomas earned a degree as a mild-to-moderate intervention specialist, a career focused on working with people with special needs. Thomas said his knowledge in this background helps him feel comfortable around strangers.

“We have events where we go and meet little kids,” he said. “It helps me interact because I am used to interacting teaching wise, and this is almost the same thing.”

Thomas’ basketball career began just outside of Delaware, Ohio, where he made the varsity team as a freshman playing for the Division II Buckeye Valley Barons.

Donovan Barrett, the Barons’ head coach, said he knew they had something special in Thomas.

“His first game was against a Division I school and he scored 16 points off the bench,” Barrett said. “After that game I knew we had someone special.”

Thomas grew about five inches during his sophomore year, making him a bigger point guard who could handle the ball, Barrett said. Starting that year, a buzz about college ball began to surround Thomas.

“I felt it was my job to keep him humble,” Barrett said.

Thomas was the most coachable player Barrett said he has ever had.

“When your best player is also the hardest working, it is a gift,” he said.

Acknowledging every constructive criticism and always willing to work, Thomas averaged 26 points per game his senior year. Recognizing this skill, the Falcons snatched Thomas as a strong recruit.

“I liked his size and his ability to score,” said University head coach Louis Orr. “He had really good energy and was very competitive.”

Thomas is a rare breed of basketball player, Orr said.

“He was 6 feet 7 inches, has great ball control and an excellent basketball IQ,” he said.

Orr and Barrett don’t only think Thomas is a well-rounded player; they also agree he is also a good teammate.

“He is what I call loosey-goosey; he didn’t let stuff bother him,” Orr said. “He had all the attributes you look for. He had courage and was not afraid to step up.”

Thomas graduated with 393 points for the Falcons and a 3-point shooting-average of .371. In his senior year he was named to the All-MAC Third Team.

Orr said he believes in Thomas and knows he can have great success in his professional career.

“As long as Scott wants to play, and keeps his love for the game, I think the sky is the limit,” Orr said.